A run-in with a skunk

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.


Frequently while we are out delivering our newspapers, we see, hear and smell all kinds of wildlife. Last week, we posted about seeing a mule deer doe and her baby, we even posted a great picture of the two of them. Most of the time though, we are not so lucky to capture pictures of the creatures we see, which is the case of the skunk Al stumbled upon last night.

As mentioned above, we included smell and boy do we smell a lot of skunks while we are out. Everyone once and awhile we will see them from our cars but never face to face. That all changed last night! Al was delivering papers in a very large apartment complex and as she walked around a corner, there was a skunk standing in the middle of the sidewalk. EEEEKKKK! We startled each other! Al took a step back and the skunk slowly turned around and showed her its lovely raised tail and tush. Al stood still and silently pleaded with the skunk to not spray her. Luckily her prayers were answered and the skunk crept into the bushes and Al continued on with her delivery.

This interaction led to some research about skunks that we thought we would share with you:

  • Skunks can be found from the southern parts of Canada, throughout most of the United States and into the northern parts of Mexico.
  • They have great sense of smell and hearing but poor eyesight. They can only see about 10 feet in front of them.
  • They can spray a target 10 feet away (Al was definitely in the spray zone).
  • Skunks are omnivorous.

Hopefully one day we will be able to capture a photo of a skunk without being sprayed!

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Photo Friday: Mule Deer Doe & Baby

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature, Our Work, Photography | 1 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

We work at night, driving around Tucson, delivering newspapers and this affords us the chance to see various types of wildlife that we never get the chance to see during the day. Growing up, we would see street signs on our nearby streets that warned of deer as seen below.

We always laughed, “There aren’t any deer around here!!!” We soon discovered after starting our delivery job, they do exist around here. We see both bucks and does, but we usually se them alone, never in pairs or groups. They also move very fast so we have never been able to take a photo of them. That is until last night! We spotted a Mule Deer doe and her baby. They stood still long enough for us to take this awesome photo. The baby didn’t want to turn around for us but it was super cute!


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Wordless Wednesday #26 | Gulf fritillary on lantana flowers

Wordless Wednesday #26 | Gulf fritillary on lantana flowers

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature, Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

gulf fritillary on lantana flowers arizona
If you enjoy this photograph, you can purchase a print of it through our Zazzle store, where you can order prints of our other photographs as well. A card version and postcard version of the this photograph are also available. Happy Wednesday!

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Wordless Wednesday #25 | Vermilion Flycatcher

Wordless Wednesday #25 | Vermilion Flycatcher

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature, Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 3 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Vermilion Flycatcher are members of the tyrant flycatcher family which is the largest family of birds with over 400 species. Vermilion Flycatchers are unique to the family because most are a drab brown color and these guys are bring red/pink. However this coloring only occurs in males while females are brown; this phenomenon is called sexual dimorphism.
vermilion flycatcher
If you enjoy this photograph, you can purchase a print of it through our Zazzle store, where you can order prints of our other photographs as well. A card version and postcard version of the this photograph are also available. Happy Wednesday!

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Wordless Wednesday #24 | Giant Swallowtail on a Desert Bird of Paradise

Wordless Wednesday #24 | Giant Swallowtail on a Desert Bird of Paradise

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature, Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

We love butterflies. Lucky for us, there are 250 species of butterfly in the Sonoran Desert. Giant Swallowtails are an interesting species because of their unique flight pattern; they appear to be hopping through the air. We caught this one while on a mid-afternoon stroll, having a snack on a Desert Bird of Paradise.

giant swallowtail on a desert bird of paradise
If you enjoy this photograph, you can purchase a print of it through our Zazzle store, where you can order prints of our other photographs as well. A card version and postcard version of the this photograph are also available. Happy Wednesday!

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Wordless Wednesday #23 | Female House Sparrow in a Saguaro

Wordless Wednesday #23 | Female House Sparrow in a Saguaro

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This week’s Wordless Wednesday photograph is of a Female House Sparrow nesting in a Saguaro. House Sparrows are usually very flighty and don’t stay still long enough for us to take great pictures of so this was a pleasant surprise.

Sparrow in a Saguaro

If you enjoy this photograph, you can purchase a print of it through our Zazzle store, where you can order prints of our other photographs as well. A card version and postcard version of the this photograph are also available. Happy Wednesday!

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Wordless Wednesday #22 | Juvenile Roadrunner

Wordless Wednesday #22 | Juvenile Roadrunner

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature, Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 2 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Today’s Wordless Wednesday photograph is a juvenile Greater Roadrunner. We normally only see large, adult roadrunners in our area, so this was a first for us.

Roadrunners are members of the cuckoo family and can be seen as far west as California and as far east as Louisiana. You can read more about them and hear their castanet-like rattle and other unique calls at Allaboutbirds.org.
Wordless Wednesday Juvenile Roadrunner

If you enjoy this photograph, you can purchase a print of it through our Zazzle store, where you can order prints of our other photographs as well. A card version and postcard version of the Juvenile Roadrunner are also available. Happy Wednesday!

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Bobcat in Our Neighborhood! (PHOTOS)

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood! (PHOTOS)

posted in: Living in the Southwest, Nature | 2 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Living in the desert southwest is exciting. We have previously shown you some of the beautiful flowers and some birds we see in the desert.

Every once in awhile we stumble upon a rarity. Once in a blue moon we see coyotes and javelinas during the day but they are more active at night. The other mammal that we rarely see is the illusive bobcat.

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 2

The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is also known as a wildcat and is the mascot of our alma mater University of Arizona. Bear Down!

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 5

The last time we saw a bobcat in the wild was when we first moved to our house in 2002. We thought we would never see one again. But we were wrong.

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 6

On Sunday, Al was walking through the neighborhood minding her own business. Then got the feeling someone had their eyes on her.

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 4

She stopped and looked around and found a bobcat sitting on top of a mound, sitting in the shade. The sight of a bobcat was exhilarating and breathtaking.


Look at those paws!

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 7

The bobcat was panting due to the heat. It is rare to see a bobcat in the middle of the day because they are crepuscular meaning they are active at twilight.

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 3

Waiting for some “potguts” aka Round-tailed Ground Squirrels to emerge from their underground tunnels.

Bobcat in Our Neighborhood 1

Al felt so lucky that she had her camera with her. As soon as she started taking the photos, she thought, I can’t wait to post this on the blog!

We hope you enjoyed this wildlife spotting as much as we did! Happy Tuesday!

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Wordless Wednesday #14 | Gila Woodpecker and Cactus

Wordless Wednesday #14 | Gila Woodpecker and Cactus

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Gila Woodpecker and Cactus

A Gila Woodpecker takes a break from his cactus fruit snack to see who is taking his photo.


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Cat Poetry from our Poetry Collection “Two by Two”:  Poem 31. Domestic

Cat Poetry from our Poetry Collection “Two by Two”: Poem 31. Domestic

posted in: Our Work, Poetry | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Today’s post is an excerpt from our collection of poetry, Two by Two: Into the White. It is available for purchase for just 99 cents on Amazon!

31. domestic

rounded mountain back
dip of concave shoulder blades

swish, swish, flick
periscope tail never wags

soft paws, rough tongue
white chin, green eyes

eighteen claws, twenty-three whiskers
lick, lick, lick, never done

stripes and spots standing on end
watching, listening

crouched down low to the brown
brown carpet of earth

among the tall grass
of dining chair legs

The Inspiration

cat, feline, domestic shorthair

The inspiration for this poem was Billy, the Most AMAZING Cat!. We’ve been family for nearly eight years now and I have spent a lot of time just observing his movements. That might sound creepy to some extroverts, but to introverts, observing is our number one hobby. The introduction to the “nature” section of Two by Two reads as follows:

dogs and deserts and domestic shorthairs
dancing on the mother earth

daring to do, to live, to be
while we admire and provide rationale

I think that really captures why we love animals so much. This poem is a vignette of Bill as he goes about his business. He doesn’t worry about how others perceive him. He doesn’t second guess himself. He just is.

A great lesson for us humans.

2x2 End of Post Feature

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