Happy International Cat Day!

posted in: Nonfiction, Our Work, Woof Trekking, Writing | 1 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Happy International Cat Day! We have two cats that we absolutely adore and celebrate every day, not just on International Cat Day. Mac is the furry mom to Billy, a 9 year old male tabby. You can read more about him here. Billy is the definition of a mellow cat. He loves to sleep and once a day harass Izzy, our crazy Wheaten Terrier.
cat, feline, domestic shorthair
Al is the furry mom to Tyra, a 13 year old female white cat. You can read more about her here. Tyra is not a fan of other animals but loves to cuddle with Al.

We have taken both of them on road trips with us at different times in the past. Check out our book, Woof Trekking: How To Road Trip with Your Pets, where we give advice on how to travel with your favorite cat.

We recently read about a pretty cool cat. The newly elected Prime Minister of New Zealand is Jacinda Ardern and she has an awesome cat named Paddles. Paddles is unique because she has a set of crazy thumbs! She also has her own twitter account which is pretty hilarious.


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Tips for Holiday Travel with Pets

Tips for Holiday Travel with Pets

posted in: Nonfiction, On the Road, Our Work, Travel, Woof Trekking, Writing | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

With the holidays coming up, many of you will be traveling over the river and through the woods to grandmother’s house. Pet lovers may be taking their precious pups and furry felines on the road with them, perhaps for the first time. If you are new to the ways of Woof Trekking (road tripping with your pets), this may cause some anxiety for both the humans and the pets. But have no fear, we are here to help.
holiday-travel-with-pets-2
We have been traveling with our two dogs, Izzy and Nana, and one cat, Billy, for four years. We have gained a lot of knowledge to share with you. If you are new to our blog, you can take a look at our previous woof trekking posts here. We have also written a book about our experience with traveling with our cat and two dogs. You can get your copy on Amazon and Kobo.
woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets
You may be surprised that we travel with our cat, however Billy is a pretty chill cat who does fairly well on the road. If you want to take your cat with you (or a skittish dog for that matter), taking them on short, little trips to see how they handle going in the car is a good idea. We actually have two cats, but Tyra doesn’t travel well and prefers to stay home and be kenneled.

We have previously talked about what to pack for both your dogs and your cats. Some important items include: food, bowls, and kitty litter box.

Safety is very important while traveling with your pets and we have some tips to keep everyone safe. First of all safety in the car is very important, both of our dogs wear car harnesses so they can be buckled in. Billy also wears a harness so he too can be buckled up while riding in a human’s lap. You can read more about car harnesses here.


Some dogs and cats travel really well on the road and have no problems. Nana is one of these dogs. She loves car rides and watching the world pass by. Izzy is the opposite, she loves getting into the car but as soon as it starts moving, she becomes anxious and starts to whine. When we travel, we give her Dramamine, per the recommendation of our vet, and it takes the edge off. (Always talk to your vet before giving your pet medication.) Billy on the other hand gets motion sick in the car. He also gets Dramamine to help him deal with this. You can read more about Anxiety and Motion Sickness here.
pacific coast highway 9
The last point we would like to make is about hotel safety. Some hotels are better than others but all should be inspected before letting your pets loose. We have found some interesting objects hidden under the bed. Our biggest tip is to get down on your hands and knees with a flashlight to clear the floor of any dropped pills and other foreign objects.

Go forth and don’t be afraid to take your pets on the road with you. If you want to read more about our travels, get a copy of our book. Bringing your pets on your travels will make your adventures even more memorable!

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Wordless Wednesday #19 | The Other Arc de Triomphe

Wordless Wednesday #19 | The Other Arc de Triomphe

posted in: Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Last week, our Wordless Wednesday post featured the Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile. This week, we feature the other Arc de Triomphe which we also visited in 2007.

The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is located outside the Louvre and is situated 3.4 kilometers down the road from the better known Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile. “Du Carrousel” is about half the size of “De l’Étoile” and only took 2 years to finish compared to the 30 years of “De l’Étoile”. We think that both Arc de Triomphes are beautiful! How about you?

Happy Wednesday everyone!

arc-de-triomphe-du-carrousel


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Wordless Wednesday #18 | Arc de Triomphe, 2007

Wordless Wednesday #18 | Arc de Triomphe, 2007

posted in: Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Today’s Wordless Wednesday is another from our 2007 trip to Europe. We previously shared photos of the White Cliffs of Dover in Wordless Wednesday #16 and Big Ben in Wordless Wednesday #5. It was very exciting to see the Arc de Triomphe in person since a painting of the triumphal arch has hung in our house for as long as we can remember.

WW 18 Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe was built from 1806 to 1836. It was commissioned by Napoleon to honor the Grand Armée. The arch was modeled after the Arch of Titus in Rome, according to Napoleon.org. You can read more about the history of the Arc de Triomphe at arcdetriompheparis.com/history and visitor information at arcdetriompheparis.com/visitor-information.

Happy Wednesday!

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Woof Trekking Packing Checklist: Cat Basics

Woof Trekking Packing Checklist: Cat Basics

posted in: On the Road, What to Pack, Woof Trekking | 3 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Our latest book, Woof Trekking, is all about how to road trip with your pets. In a previous post, we showed you all the essentials we pack for our dogs. You can check that list out here.

What to Pack for a Woof Trekking Cat

In today’s post we will show you what we pack for Billy, the Most AMAZING cat.

Petmate Top Entry Litter Pan

This litter bin is very similar to the one Billy uses both at home and on Woof Treks. Since it has high sides, it blocks the litter from flying everywhere.

Petlinks Purr-fect Paws Cat Litter Mat

We travel with a mat like this one to catch the kitty litter that gets trapped in Billy’s paws as he exits his restroom. This helps limit the spread of the litter.

Dirt Devil Scorpion Quick Flip Corded Bagless Handheld Vacuum

This may seem a little crazy but we travel with a small vacuum to clean up any kitty litter that has escaped from the bin. It also comes in handy if some other mess has happened while we are on the road.


Petmate Ultimate Litter Scoop

This is the exact scooper we use, it is excellent because it had an elongated handle and a wide scoop to handle large loads. ?

woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets

10 Gallon Trash Bags

We bring a roll of these trash bags on our Woof Treks because some hotels don’t provide them. This is especially important when disposing of the contents of Billy’s bin.

IAMS Proactive Health Original Adult Dry Cat Food

Billy’s food, the only kind he likes so this is what he gets. He hasn’t gone grain free like the dogs because the food makes him sick. ?

Snapware 10-Cup Airtight Rectangle Food Storage Container

This the type of container we use to bring Billy’s food on the road with us. It has a slim profile so it is easy to pack.


LoveOurHome Cool Pet Cat Bowl

On the road, Billy uses a small bowl like this to eat out of. It is great because it is small enough to be stored in the food container and act as a scoop. If you are only traveling with a cat, then these bowls would also be great as a water bowl.

Whisker Lickin’s Cat Treats

We always remember to bring along Billy’s favorite treats. They are good as a yummy snack when we get to the room and also come in handy if he needs to be lured out of somewhere he ought not be. They were a lifesaver when he snuck under the bed of a hotel, read the whole story here.

Cat Harness and Leash

Billy wears a harness and leash at all times on Woof Treks. The harness also has a tag on it that has information about his microchip; if he ever escapes (knock on wood), people will have a way to contact us. The harness and leash help to secure him to a person in the car. In the room, it allows for him to be easily found. The previous story also explains why we keep the leash on him in the room.

We hope you enjoyed this post. Stay tuned for more posts about what to pack on your Woof Trek!

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Woof Trekking Packing Checklist: Dog Basics

Woof Trekking Packing Checklist: Dog Basics

posted in: On the Road, What to Pack, Woof Trekking | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Happy Friday, everyone! For today’s post, we wanted to give you an in-depth look at what we bring with us on our Woof Treks. We will be focusing on the first section of the packing checklist: Dog Basics. You can find the full checklist at the bottom of this post.

woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets

FOOD

When it comes to feeding our dogs, our vet has fully convinced us to go “grain-free”. We had heard about Taste of the Wild ever since we took Izzy to puppy school six years ago, but thought it was too expensive. However, our vet has since made the case, and now we only feed our dogs the best.


Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food


Wellness Thick & Chunky Stews Natural Wet Canned Dog Food
 

CAN OPENER

A good can opener can be hard to find. We’ve tried both Martha Stewart brand and the Oxo brand openers, with plenty of early success. But after a while, the opener gets all clogged and rusty. That hasn’t happened with our Zyliss.


Zyliss Lock N’ Lift Manual Can Opener with Lid Lifter Magnet
 

FOOD BOWL

Their current food bowls look a lot like the bowl below. They are nice and sturdy, but on the road, they can get a bit bulky.


Petrageous Designs Pooch Basics Pet Bowl

Consequently, we purchased smaller, lighter bowls like the bowl below for future Woof Treks.


Loving Pets Bella Bowl Dog Bowl
 

WATER BOWL

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. We bring the same water bowl that the dogs and cat use at home. As mentioned in Woof Trekking, when we are on a hike, we will just pour a small stream of water from our water bottles into our dogs’ mouths and they love it.


PetFusion Premium Brushed Stainless Steel Bowl
 

CRATE

We lug their large crates with us on every single Woof Trek. They don’t actually take up much space, since they are collapsible. Still, they’re heavy! We’ve been looking into alternatives (like this one) but haven’t actually purchased one yet.


Aspenpet Pet Porter Kennel
 

BEDDING

Izzy and Nana each have a blanket in the bottom of their crates. We tried putting in more padded bedding, but they pushed it out of the way. We believe this is because they like the cool feeling of the plastic when they get hot at night.


Pet Dog Cat Blanket Mat Bed with Paw Prints
 

PET WASTE BAGS

We recycle a lot of grocery bags to pick up pet waste, but will occasionally splurge on these. A surprising number of rest areas throughout the country supply these, but it’s best to have your own stock, just in case.


AmazonBasics Dog Waste Bags with Dispenser and Leash Clip

 

GET THE FULL CHECKLIST

FREE PDF DOWNLOAD: Woof Trekking Checklist

checklist preview

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Woof Trekking Packing Checklist Dog Basics

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Woof Trekking Hotel Safety: Who’s Hiding Under the Bed?

Woof Trekking Hotel Safety: Who’s Hiding Under the Bed?

posted in: On the Road, Woof Trekking | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Today’s post is an adaptation of a chapter from our new book, Woof Trekking.

woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets

Most hotels put their beds on metal boxes so nothing can go under the bed. For the most part they work, except occasionally at the head of the bed.

Sometimes the box ends before it touches the wall and leaves a cat/small dog-sized hole to crawl into. If you aren’t paying attention, your pet can end up under the bed and you can’t really get them out without a lot of time and/or coercion.

It would be wise to also take some of the extra pillows (you could use towels as an alternative) and create a blockade in front of any holes. We learned about this the hard way.

During our first Woof Trek, we would remove the leash from Billy’s harness when we arrived at the hotel. One night, we were not really paying attention and Billy found a hole we had missed at the foot of the bed.

Hotel Safety with Pets Hiding Under the Bed 1

We tried to grab his hind end but he slipped through and ended up inside the box spring!

Hotel Safety with Pets Hiding Under the Bed 2

We tried to lure him out by calling him and shaking his treat container, but he wouldn’t come.


Hotel Safety with Pets Hiding Under the Bed 3

We finally gave up as Billy enjoyed lording his newfound power over Mac. She left some treats by the entrance to his newfound Kat Kave.

Hotel Safety with Pets Hiding Under the Bed 4

Eventually, Billy got bored and came out from under the bed to take the bait.

Hotel Safety with Pets Hiding Under the Bed 5

Hearing the sound of his munching, we grabbed him, put the leash back on him, and blocked the entrance to his Kat Kave.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this adaptation from our book, Woof Trekking.

P.S. We highly recommend investing in a cat harness and leash.

woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets

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Wordless Wednesday #11: Forbidden City, Beijing, China, 2008

Wordless Wednesday #11: Forbidden City, Beijing, China, 2008

posted in: Our Work, Photography, Wordless Wednesday | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

The Forbidden City! Today’s WW hails from our 2008 trip to China, just like Travel Thursday #1 published last month. We travelled there with a band and learned quite a lot about China and Chinese culture. Stay tuned for more photos and tidbits about our trip.

Forbidden City, Beijing, China


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Woof Trekking: Rest Stops, Apps, and a $14.5 Million Price Tag

Woof Trekking: Rest Stops, Apps, and a $14.5 Million Price Tag

posted in: On the Road, Travel, Woof Trekking | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Today’s post is an adaptation of a chapter from our new book, Woof Trekking.

woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets

When Woof Trekkking, some people can drive for hours and hours without stopping to use the restroom. These people must have bladders of steel. Our family does not, probably because we like to stay well hydrated while on the road.

Sometimes when you are driving along, nature can call rather abruptly and adamantly. You feel relieved when you see a rest stop is near on the roadside sign. You only have to wait a couple more minutes and then as you approach, you see it is barricaded and closed. Oh no!

We recently discovered that there is an app called USA Rest Stops that can be downloaded for free for both Apple and Android users. It relies on reporting from users, a lot like the Gas Buddy App.

Another cool app is called Trucker Path. From the name, you can tell that the app is geared more toward truckers, however, it could also be helpful to you on your Woof Trek. Besides weigh stations and large vehicle parking availability, the app also includes rest stop locations and gas stations with current prices (like Love’s and Pilot). It is also available for Android through Amazon.

As an alternative, most states have a list of rest areas online that can be found with a bit of Googling. Some sites also list whether each rest area is open or closed. If a rest stop isn’t nearby, there are always those golden arches available, as well as other restaurants or gas stations.

Most of the time we need to stop at rest stops for the human bladders amongst us. The dogs don’t get out every single time we stop. Izzy and Nana are on opposite ends of the spectrum: Nana can hold it forever, while Izzy can always squeeze out a few drops. Most rest stops have dog designated areas and many of these areas also provide small bags for pet waste. They are usually quite dependable to be free of holes. We like to take a couple each time we run into one of these stands. This way, we are always prepared. That being said, we always bring a good supply of waste bags with us, too.

One quirk about Nana is that when we are on a Woof Trek she enjoys marking her territory. She pees on significant places like prominent rocks and tree trunks. It’s like a big flashing sign, “NANA WAS HERE!”

If we have been driving for an extended period of time, everyone gets out to stretch their legs and investigate the new surroundings. There are some nice rest areas across the US. One of our favorites is in west Texas, Ward County West/East Bound and no wonder… According to the local Texas news, it came with a $14.5 million price tag! ? ? ?

 

Other nice rest areas are located in tandem with State Welcome Centers, where you can also pick up maps and brochures. One of our favorite examples of such a rest stop-welcome center combo was in Mississippi (pictured below).

rest stop

 

We hope this information helps you on your next Woof Trek!

woof trekking, pets, road trip, vacation, holiday, travel, travel with pets

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Woof Trekking Dispatch #1: Angels Flight, July 2012

Woof Trekking Dispatch #1: Angels Flight, July 2012

posted in: Dispatches, On the Road, Travel, Woof Trekking | 1 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Los Angeles was our very first stop on our very first Woof Trek. On our second day there, we drove around the downtown area and found a parking spot in the shade of the towering skyscrapers. We were on a mission to see Angels Flight.

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twitter angels flight

Angels Flight is a funicular railway that runs up and down Bunker Hill. It originally opened in 1901, then closed in 1969, and reopened in 1996. Another fun detail is that the cars are named: Olivet and Sinai.

angels flight - 8

As we sat down to write this article, we discovered that Angels Flight closed in July 2013, due to apparent safety issues. What’s more is that the green space around Angels Flight, aka Angels Knoll, has also been closed according to this LA Times article. The park was featured in the movie (500) Days of Summer (Source).

angels flight - 5

We first heard about Angels Flight from one of our favorite mystery authors, Michael Connelly. The 6th Harry Bosch novel is titled Angels Flight and is an excellent book that we highly recommend for fans of the mystery genre and of Los Angeles.


Angels Flight (A Harry Bosch Novel)

We hopped on at the bottom and prepared ourselves for an excellent adventure!

angels flight - 9

The view from the top. Not a particularly long ride, but fun none the less!

angels flight - 2

Here is an official ticket stub that we received once we exited the little train.

angels flight - 3

Here you can see the ticket booth at the top of the hill.

angels flight - 4

Another beauty shot of the tangerine titans.

angels flight - 7

We had a great time going up on Angels Flight. The dogs did not ride with us, as it seemed unlikely that that would be allowed. We realize that this article is not very “Woof,” so we found a couple other articles to compensate:

‘Table for two. One of us will sit on the floor.’ Pet-friendly L.A. restaurants
We particularly like the sound of #3, Lazy Dog restaurant and bars with its dog friendly meal options.

13 Things Your Dog Really Wants To Do With You in Los Angeles
Our favorite from this list is #7, the BowWow Workout, with its human + dog workouts! Check out the video below!

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Woof Trekking: Anxiety and Motion Sickness (100th Post!!!)

Woof Trekking: Anxiety and Motion Sickness (100th Post!!!)

posted in: On the Road, Woof Trekking | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

First, we want to mention that this post is our 100th post on zydoyle.com! Can you believe it? We wanted to start a blog for a very long time, and we are so glad that on 12/31/2014, we finally took the plunge. Thank you all for reading our posts. We look forward to what the future has to bring! Now, on to today’s post, which is an adaptation of a chapter from our new book, Woof Trekking.

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Note: If your pets get anxiety or motion sickness when traveling, check with your veterinarian prior to giving them any medications.

Anxiety and motion sickness can be a big challenge when bringing pets on a road trip, aka Woof Trekking. Before you take your pets on a Woof Trek, we suggest taking several trips in the car around town a few weeks in advance. Then you can gauge your pet’s car riding personality. “Get your pet geared up by taking him on a series of short drives first, gradually lengthening time spent in the car,” says the ASPCA in their great article, “Travel Safety Tips.”

When it comes to how well our pets handle Woof Trekking, they are all over the spectrum.

The Pro

c4a

Nana has no problems on the road. She absolutely loves riding in the car. She is very good at controlling her body through twists and turns by leaning against the centrifugal force. She will crane her neck to watch the road through the front windshield. We are convinced that if she somehow acquired the necessary skills, she could drive to the park herself.

The Lightweight

c4b

Billy, in general is very good in the car, but he does have one big problem. He gets motion sick. In the past, Billy has received a half tablet of Dramamine (Meclizine Version) on the first couple mornings of the Woof Trek, at the advice of our veterinarian.

It makes Billy pretty drowsy. We only give it to him the first couple days, because after that, he tends to have adjusted to life on the highway. The Dramamine works, but only up to a point. If the road winds back and forth, he can still get sick.

We recently changed veterinarians and he suggested switching to Dramamine (Dimenhydrinate Version) or Benadryl to help Billy with his motion sickness, but we have not yet tried either of these options. Talk with your veterinarian to decide what solutions may be appropriate if your pet is prone to motion sickness.

The Wild Card

c4c

Izzy can get a bit anxious in the car, especially on the first day. She pants and can whine on occasion, but eventually she settles down. Like Billy, she has received Dramamine (Meclizine Version), per the advice our previous veterinarian, to help cope with this. We give her the pill about an hour before we leave, and she becomes much more mellow and less stressed. Again, we only give it for the first couple days because after that, she has adjusted to our new schedule.

ohanafamily

You might ask, if Izzy is so stressed, why not just leave her at home? We tried once in 2013. Everyone was kenneled while we attended a funeral. We were gone for four days. Nana did fine. Billy gave Mac the cold shoulder for about a week, but was otherwise fine. But while we were gone, Izzy went on a hunger strike. She can be quite sensitive and is very social. It was the first time we had ever left her behind, and it is likely to be the last. She is the type who could expire from a broken heart. So now, we never leave her behind. We are her ohana and we won’t ever forget her.

WT End of Post Feature


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Of GIFTs and Woof Treks: Two New Series for Our Blog

Of GIFTs and Woof Treks: Two New Series for Our Blog

posted in: Food, Grandma Inspired Fantastic Treats (GIFTs), Woof Trekking | 1 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

In the coming days, we are going to debut two new series of blog posts.

The first series will be about our travels with our pets, aka Woof Trekking. The second series will be recipes inspired by our grandma, aka Grandma-Inspired Fantastic Treats (GIFTs).

It may not seem like it, but these two series are deeply connected.

Four years ago, both of our grandparents passed away on the same day (as we previously blogged about in Nana the Brave!). Our grandpa’s passing was expected, while our grandma’s was not. She passed away six hours before he did, even though she was in near perfect health for an 86-year-old. They always said they wanted to pass away together and walk up to heaven holding hands. In the end, they did.

Their passing induced two major changes in our lives. The first was adopting Nana. The second was our Commemorative Road Trip along the West Coast.

We travelled up the Pacific Coast Highway, through San Francisco, and up to Oregon, where our Grandma was born. The featured image of this post is “The Torii Gate” located outside the Portland Expo Center. It features “3,500 identification tags… to represent the same number of Japanese‐Americans housed at the Portland Assembly Center located at Expo during World War II.” (Source: http://www.expocenter.org/sites/default/files/pdf/expohistory_rev_2011.pdf)

of gifts and woof treks

From there, we travelled to Minidoka, Idaho (see our previous blog post about Minidoka here) where she was interned during World War II and then down to Brigham City, Utah where she met our grandpa. This trip turned out to be our very first Woof Trek, and paved the way for many more excursions with our pets across the United States.

In the Woof Trekking series, we will talk about locations we have Woof Trekked to and show you that it is possible to take your pets on the road with you.

When we returned home from the Commemorative Road Trip, we had to sift through all of our grandparents belongings. During this process, we discovered several cookbooks and cooking magazines in which our grandma had made a ton of little notes and corrections to recipes.

In the Grandma-Inspired Fantastic Treats (GIFT) series, we will make these recipes and share them with you, our readers! We will also be making dishes that remind us of stories about our grandparents (like our post about Chicken Souvlaki.) Grandma loved sweets, so many of the recipes will be baked goods, but every once and awhile we will also post a savory dish she liked.

We hope that you come back and read our two new blog post series. Tomorrow we will have an exciting announcement. Please stay tuned!

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Book Review: “Dogtripping,” A Wild and Endearing Ride

Book Review: “Dogtripping,” A Wild and Endearing Ride

posted in: Book Reviews, Entertainment, Travel, Woof Trekking | 0 | This post may contain referral links. See privacy policy for more.

Since 2012, we have been going on semi-annual road trips with our two dogs and cat (Izzy, Nana, and Billy). Earlier this year, we stumbled upon a book at the library that is about precisely this topic.

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It seemed like fate. We had to take it home. And what’s more, when you take home a book from the library, you feel none of the bookstore guilt.

You know, when you pick out a book, read five pages, decide to buy it, then watch it sit on your shelf, accumulating layer after layer of dust. When you get books from the library, they come with a read-by date. This institution-imposed structure is exactly what we need when it comes to reading a book cover to cover.

The book is titled Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, and 3 RVs on Our Canine Cross-Country Adventure by David Rosenfelt. It is a fantastic and interesting read. Al read the physical book, while Mac listened to the audiobook on the OneClickdigital App. Both editions are great, although there are no photos with the audiobook. That is easily remedied. You can see photos from the journey, nicknamed Woof-a-bago, on David Rosenfelt’s website at http://www.davidrosenfelt.com/photos/.

Rosenfelt weaves together the story of the road trip with endearing, personal stories about his dogs. Sounds simple enough, but neither the trip nor the dogs are typical. The trip was all the way from Los Angeles to Maine and the dogs were all from the shelter/pound, dogs who were either too sick or too old to be adopted from the rescue group run by David and his wife, Debbie. Yes, read this book with a tissue box.


Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers, and 3 RVs on Our Canine Cross-Country Adventure

We loved his self-deprecation and dark humor in the writing of this novel. (FYI: Mr. Rosenfelt is also a mystery author.) All dog lovers will enjoy the relatable tales of quirky rescues. We definitely recommend this book and give it 5 stars! It was the catalyst and a source of inspiration for our upcoming book, Woof-Trekking.

We hope you enjoyed this book review and that you check out “Dogtripping”!

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